TAMPURI BOX - Musical Instruments aboriginess and ethnic

, from Córdoba ARGENTINA - Wednesday, 25 November 2020
Musical Instruments Crafts, aboriginess and ethnic

TAMPURI BOX

TAMPURIBOX - Musical Instruments Crafts
This instrument composed of a wooden box and metal strings is a reduced size and shape version of the ancient tanpura or tambura of India, a musical instrument with humming strings with a special timbre to accompany the voice as a harmonic base or some solo instrument inside. of the many styles of Indian music such as devotional chants, mantras, bhajan, kirtan, ragas, dhrupad.
Sound sample of the TampuriboxVideo of the Tampuribox
The original instrument "Tampura", "Tanpura" or "tambura", is built on a gourd resonance box as was the old Vina and a hollow wooden neck where its end supports the strings through 4, 5 or 6 wooden pegs. This instrument has a peculiar sound and during its execution providing a mantric atmosphere, a constant circular sound and plays an important role in the music of the Hindustani system such as the Carnatic (in North and South India respectively) which guides and orients the musicians as a harmonic base so that they can freely sing or play other instruments having the same harmonic reference point.
Tampuribox
ampuri Box
EsThis "TAMPURIBOX" "TANPURI BOX" "TAMPURA BOX", is a reduced version for easy transport of the same, built with different woods in order to provide as faithful as possible the original sound of the Tampura.
We have built this Tampuri Box with 4 strings (which is perhaps the most common), although there are 5 or 6 strings as well.
Tampuri Box
The original metal strings from India offer this particular sound and characteristic of all the music of that country.
Jivari o Jawuari
Jivari o Jawuari
We have built the main bridge, Jivari or Jawuari, in ebony wood, it is where the strings rest on the resonance box which produces this buzz or effect so particular of the metal stringed instruments of India, such as the traditional Tanpura, Sitar , Rudra Vina, Saraswati veena, etc. Occasionally, a fine silk thread is used, placed perpendicular to the string, between the string and the bridge or Jawari in such a way as to increase or reduce this typical tampura hum.
Jivari o Jawuari
Jivari o Jawuari
We have used guitar pegs in such a way as to simplify and improve the old wooden peg tampura, so there is no need to use microtuners on the strings anymore (as in the original Tampura), these pegs offer a precise and exact tuning in the tuning of each string.
Pegbox of the Tampuribox
Ohm Detail Tampuribox
The first strings are made of steel and the last one, which is the lowest, is made of steel covered in copper or phosphor bronze, it is usually tuned for the 4 strings in the following way: 5th, Octave, Octave, 1st tonic, (5-8- 8-1) for example to accompany a Sitarista it could be G2, C3, C3, C2, or also G # 2, C # 3, C # 3, C # 2 or also A2, Re3, Re3, Re2 for the voice female could be Mi3, La3, La3, La2, etc. In the Indian nomenclature it would be Pa-SA-SA-Sa. although depending on the Raga that is executed it could be Ma-SA-SA-Sa. (4th, Octave, Octave, 1st tonic) another variant can be Ni, SA, SA, Sa. (7th, Octave, Octave, 1st tonic), among several other possibilities.
It is worth noting a particularity of this instrument and that is that the middle strings are the finest in gauge and are the sharpest and the same in tuning, while the last bronze string is the lowest of the entire string set.
Detail Tampuribox
It is usually performed sitting on the floor with the legs intertwined on a mat, placing the tampuribox vertically supporting the base on the lap, letting it recline on the chest, then with the right hand touches the strings, in the position of the fingers almost parallel to the strings, while the thumb can rest on the body of the instrument, the first steel string is played with the middle finger, (only with the fingertip and not with the nails), the following strings with the index finger of the same the way the middle or middle finger did.
Base of Tampuribox
The intention is not to hear the attack of the strings but rather the sound after the string is struck. In the Hindustani system, each string is played for the same regular time interval pulse, while in the Carnático system the first string lasts twice as long as the others.As an alternative to playing, we have added small legs or bases to the TampuriBox ideal to support or lay the instrument on the floor and play it in this way.
We have incorporated a contact microphone which faithfully captures the loudness of the instruments top and facilitates listening in wide spaces where electronic amplifiers are used.
Tampuribox with microphone
cover of Tampuribox
The instrument is accompanied by a waterproof and highly resistant cover, padded inside which protects the tampuribox from adverse conditions such as rain, sun, heat, cold, humidity, shocks, etc.
Tampuri Box
Attention: At the moment we have in stock the

instrument TAMPURI BOX

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